The Signal #17: awkward board meetings

From our August 9 newsletter. (Don’t get it? sign up here)

***

Friends,

So you probably saw the news re Uber and Didi in China.  Uber will sell its operations in China to Didi and receive 20% of Didi. Uber joins Didi’s board; Didi joins Uber’s board.  The good folks at Pitchbook had a little visual fun with what this means from a shareholder / stakeholder perspective. pitchbook uber didi map.png

Um, awkward bedfellows.  Which is a good segue into the subject of today’s newsletter – strategic investment. And how it can be really awkward.

First, some terminology: what is corporate venture from the corporate investor perspective is strategic investment from the startup perspective.  The startup has decided that equity investment (not NRE; this is a subject for another day) from a strategic (corporate) investor will have value over and above the cash it would get from a traditional VC: perhaps through distribution, perhaps through imprimatur (i.e., the lift that would come when, say, Google or Intel invest), maybe through reach into an otherwise hard market (like, say, Japan!).  This is the principle behind strategic investment.  And it all sounds great. The partner has some skin in the game. They’re invested in you. What could go wrong?

Then there’s the tactical reality. The courtship process with a strategic investor means exposing your finances and plans to a potential customer/partner/acquirer. Some of those secrets will be given away *before* the investment happens – the corporate VC could just walk away. This is more likely than not – a corporate VC probably invests in 1% of all the companies it meets over the course of a year.lucy-football.jpg

Thus, to the entrepreneur, this is a gamble.  Despite what the VC may say, the entrepreneur should assume information will be shared between the investment arm and the business units.   Which is why a corporate VC needs to tread a delicate balance between doing its diligence and being perceived as on a fishing mission.

In Jon’s past life at Rosum (which had corporate venture investment from Motorola, In-Q-Tel and Disney, and from its ultimate acquirer, TruePosition) there was a certain corporate VC that would come calling every year. Despite our misgivings each year we’d suit up, pitch, and they’d go away for another year. It was like Charlie Brown and Lucy, and Lucy kept pulling the football away.   Further, each strategic investor had its own wish list. How to address potential n=1 requests while still scaling? This was an ongoing question, and ultimately we weren’t successful at answering it.

Some strategic investors want information rights; others want observer rights, meaning, they get to be in the room during board meetings though they can’t vote and can’t stay for executive sessions. Others, particularly those that function as lead investors, will have voting rights. So, for the startup, there’s the question of how much of how transparent are you willing to be? Are you willing to have a strategic investor / partner / candidate acquirer sit in the board room while you candidly discuss opportunities and challenges your company faces?  If a strategic investor really invested  in your success?  Or are they just keeping tabs on a disruptive technology?

These are things the entrepreneur should think about, and conversely they are nuances the corporate investor should be aware of. They are also reasons why corporate venture isn’t as easy as it might seem.

– Team Blue Field

 

コーポレートVCの「呉越同舟」

ウーバーと中国の滴滴出行については、読者の皆様もすでにご承知のとおり。もっぱら「ウーバーの撤退」と言われますが、滴滴に中国事業を売却した見返りに20%の滴滴株を受け取っていますので、いわば「呉越同舟」(中国なだけに?)となったとも言えます。

最近、シリコンバレーでコーポレート・ベンチャー・キャピタル(CVC)を運営する、あるいはやりたい、という企業が(国籍問わず)増えています。投資する側から見ての「CVC」は、投資される起業家から見ると「戦略投資」です。その名のとおり、純粋の金銭関係ではなく、自社プロダクトのディストリビューションの手段や、ブランド力などの戦略的付加価値を期待して投資を受け入れるわけです。

戦略投資家は、将来的に顧客・パートナー・売却先になる可能性がある訳ですが、投資検討の過程では、実際に投資に至る前に、かなりの自社情報を投資家候補に開示する必要が生じます。しかし、CVCが投資検討したベンチャーのうち、最終的に投資に至るものは、せいぜい1%程度と言われており、ベンチャーから見れば「ほとんど」の場合、CVCに情報をタダで持って行かれてしまうということです。そして、「CVCと本体の間で情報はやりとりしない」と約束したとしても、完全にシャットアウトすることはほぼ不可能です。そのため、起業家からみれば、センシティブな情報がCVCの事業部門に共有されるという前提で接触したほうが良いかもしれません。

つまり、ベンチャー側から見ればCVCとのつきあいは、場合によっては自分の競合になるかもしれない相手に貴重な情報を与える「ギャンブル」ということになります。だから、CVC側にとっては、「デュー・デリジェンス」をきちんとやるということと、ベンチャーに「ただ情報を取りたいだけなのでは」という疑念を起こさせ、ディールが失敗することの間で、微妙なバランスをとらなければなりません。

Jonは、以前在籍したRosumという会社でこれを経験しました。同社はモトローラ、In-Q-Tel、ディズニーから「戦略出資」を受けていましたが、その他にとあるCVCが投資を検討したいとやって来て、こちらが準備してスーツを着込んでピッチして、やはりやめたと去っていっては、また翌年また戻って同じことを繰り返していました。毎年、感謝祭が来るたびに、フットボールを蹴ろうとするチャーリー・ブラウンからボールを取り上げるルーシーを思い出します。今考えれば、我々も人が良すぎたと思います。

CVCとしては、取締役会の席が欲しいのか、投資先の取締役まで行かなくても同席して傍聴する権利が欲しいのか、漠然と情報が欲しいのか、などといろいろなレベルがあります。投資される側のベンチャーは、果たしてどこまでCVCに情報を渡す覚悟があるのか、CVCがどこまで自社の成長にコミットしてくれているのか、常に考えておく必要があります。

CVCとベンチャーは、まさに目的が違う人々が同じ舟に乗る「呉越同舟」の関係にあります。CVCとしても、ベンチャー側がどういう目で自分たちを見ているのか、承知した上で舟に乗る必要があるといえます。

海部